52 Project – 3: Return of the Film

OK, I am now 2 weeks behind schedule in the 52 project, but quality counts right?

Am I inspired by Daido Moriyama…?  I am not so sure, I didn’t go to his exhibition earlier (I really should have, but just didn’t).  Yet with the high contrast, grungy look, seems like this is another copycat work of his…

The truth is I was using a roll of ISO50-200 Lomography Redscale film.  Its the first time I used it and I wasn’t expecting it to be sooooo red!  Anyway its not a bad try and achieved some decent results.

This roll was mostly street snaps, as you may realise…  Given the convenience and the autofocus of the modern day DSLR, using the old Nikon F3 on the streets make it this much challenging and rewarding.  I still love the feeling of anticipation, waiting for the film to be developed and seeing if I got any good (or bad) stuff… unlike the DSLR world where you just see what you shot, and re-shoot if needed.

This is also my first go at multiple exposure with film (I never really tried this with photoshop either).  Great fun.  Colour temperature was awful, still need to work out how to use the film.  Another excellent experiment.  Enjoy and comment!

TL

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Where is my DSLR?

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This was taken a while back when I want to Kaohsiung, Tainan.  It was actually taken after my breakfast, I left my DSLR in the room and I only had my point & shoot with me.  The view and light was excellent and so I just shot the photo in Panorama mode in the Sony DC (it was a TX-10), the result was pretty pleasing.

I did some post processing adding some noise and tweaked with some curves to get the film effect.

As cliche as it is, the best camera is the camera you have with you; of course you can say you will return to the place 30 mins later, a day later, a week later…  but it will never be the same, so shoot it when you see it.  Even your camera on your smartphone will suffice…

Enjoy!

TL

At the Beach… and afterwards

I took a lot of photos along the beach in To Wo Sha last month.  It was quite a fruitful photo trip with a friend.  It was the first time I properly go out and shoot with my fish eye zoom (Canon EF8-15 f4L).

With the ultra wide angle and the intended distortions, composition becomes different from the norm when using a wide or a standard lens.  More things will be captured and you need to be very careful to avoid or include things you want.  Peripheral vision becomes necessary.  It will come with a lot of practice, so shoot more.

For this blog I want to share some tips of taking care of your gear, rather than photo skills.  Especially after a long day hot day at the beach, your lens and camera will be covered in salty moist air, and maybe some small sand blowing onto your precious class.  If you did some lens changes there may also be some which went into the camera body.  So you must remember to use your dust blower to clean your lens, the body with a dry cloth, and the sensor/mirror to make sure everything is kept properly, otherwise the salt and moisture will corrode your gear which can be rather costly.  The gear should also be placed into a moisture controlled container.  There are a lot of choices in the market, for simple seal plastic box with some dehydration packs, to electric ones which cost around HKD1000 (depending on volume).  These will keep your camera dry and in top form, and is a must for anyone serious about photography.  Go get one!

TL

Blue Sky

Circular Polarizing Lens filter, or CPL, is an invaluable tool for landscape photographers.  It is one of the rare tools which cannot be replicated in the post processing.  It can make the skies bluer, the seas clearer with better contrast.

The way it works is they align the light rays getting through the filter onto the sensor, and can reduce the refraction from the dust particles in the air, and also works on the water reflection.  These effects cannot be reproduced by Photoshop.  So I highly recommend budding landscape photographers to bring along 1 CPL with you next time you go shoot.  Depending on the diameter of your lens and also the quality of the filter, price varies from around HKD400 (USD50) to HKD1200 (USD180) for the top notch ones, e.g. B&W.  Try it out and you will never leave home without it.

TL